Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1/3379
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dc.contributor.authorWoldring, Hans-
dc.date.accessioned2015-09-28T06:25:35Z-
dc.date.available2015-09-28T06:25:35Z-
dc.date.issued1988-08-17-
dc.identifier.otherACConf88-302101852.pdf-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1/3379-
dc.description.abstractIn recent times cotton growers have seen the need to adopt new land preparation practices. In the Macquarie Valley alone, only 35% of the 1987/88 cotton crop was prepared using conventional techniques. The swing away from conventional land preparation practices has largely been in response to economic factors. However, a further factor is the greater awareness growers have in relation to maintaining and improving their soils structure. Much of this awareness has been as a result of excellent research and extension programmes. In this paper l will be dealing with the research and technical inputs which have led to innovative land preparation practices.-
dc.formatPDF-
dc.subjectSoil management-
dc.subjectSoil-
dc.subjectDecision making-
dc.subjectCotton-
dc.subjectCotton industry-
dc.subjectDecision support-
dc.subjectSoil structure-
dc.subjectExtension programmes-
dc.subjectSeedbed preparation-
dc.titleINNOVATIONS IN LAND PREPARATION-
CRDC.KeywordsUnrestrictedripping necessary, equipment started, degradation dur, nitrogen requirement, soil pits, nitrogen, tillage equipment, problem soil, irrigation layout, soil structural, tillage, soil structure, irrigation interval, water infiltration, potential, bond cotton stalk, row stalk pull, australian, structural,-
Appears in Collections:1988 Australian Cotton Conference

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