Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1/3482
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dc.contributor.authorThomson, N.J.-
dc.date.accessioned2015-09-30T06:05:42Z-
dc.date.available2015-09-30T06:05:42Z-
dc.date.issued1984-12-05-
dc.identifier.other7_pdfsam_ACConf84-308142046.pdf-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1/3482-
dc.description.abstractI will first mention some of the features distinguishing "Australian Conditions". Our industry has developed almost exclusively as a mechanised high-input industry with water and nitrogen being supplied liberally together with frequent insecticide applications to control insect pests. Thus it is similar to the American irrigated industry hut is dissimilar from less intensive forms of production practised in many less-developed countries. However it should also be realized that despite many similarities there are also important differences between Australian and U.S.A. growing conditions.-
dc.formatPDF-
dc.subjectPest insects-
dc.subjectNew South Wales-
dc.subjectCotton-
dc.subjectHeliothis-
dc.subjectDisease resistance-
dc.subjectIndustry-
dc.subjectPest resistance-
dc.subjectQuality-
dc.subjectVarieties-
dc.subjectResearch-
dc.subjectBlight-
dc.titleBREEDING FOR AUSTRALIAN CONDITIONS-
dc.subject.crdc4a-
Appears in Collections:1984 Australian Cotton Growers Research Conference

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