Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1/364
Title: Target Lead New Growers
Authors: Hill, James
Issue Date: 30-Jun-2012
Publisher: Cotton Catchment Communities CRC
Abstract: Darlington Point in 1964 and the CSIRO conducted a cotton breeding program for many years at Griffith. Cotton was the first row crop grown on Ravensworth Station at Hay and Kooba Station at Darlington Point. The cotton industry did not continue to expand mainly due to the lack of true short season varieties and seasonal rains during autumn which would have been detrimental for cotton harvest. Ironically it was George Commins who started growing maize replacing cotton as a row crop in the mid sixties at Kooba Station. George was the father of MIA cotton growers Roger and Tim Commins who have now grown cotton in the MIA for the past seven seasons.Cotton returned to Southern NSW in the mid eighties (1986/87 - 325ha) when it was grown at Hillston by the Maillor family who continue to grow cotton today. The growing of cotton was confined to the Lachlan River valley at Hillston and then expanded into the Murrumbidgee valley in 1999 with a trial area of 400ha at Twynam's property Gundaline Station, whilst also being trialled at Lake Marimley north of Balranald at the same time. Up until the last two years with the large increases in the Tabbita, Griffith, Whitton and Coleambally districts the maximum area for the southern region was approximately 16,000 ha in 2000/01.The largest area previously for the Murrumbidgee was 6700ha in 2003/04 yet all of this cotton was grown around Hay and not in the Murrumbidgee Area (MIA) nearer Griffith. This compared to approximately 6000ha for the Lachlan valley for the same season. This season (2011/12) due to increased river allocations and high prices the combined area for the Lachlan and the Murrumbidgee was 50,000ha
URI: http://www.insidecotton.com/xmlui/handle/1/364
Appears in Collections:Cotton CRC Final Reports

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