Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1/4410
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dc.contributor.authorMcPherson, Katie
dc.date.accessioned2017-02-07T23:46:05Z
dc.date.available2017-02-07T23:46:05Z
dc.date.issued2016-06-30
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1/4410
dc.description.abstractArchived soil samples from 0-30 cm that had been collected between the 1993 and 2013 from seven different experiments run by the NSW Department of Primary Industries in Queensland and New South Wales were analysed for soil C, N and P. These soils were taken from plots with differing soil management and crop rotation histories. This scholarship was aimed at the investigation of soil stoichiometric relationships of soil C, N and P to test the hypothesis that there is a potential imbalance in soil C:N:P ratios under differing soil management and crop rotations that may inhibit carbon sequestration. The soil archives were collected from the Narrabri storage facility and ground on site in preparation for laboratory analysis at the ANU. The balance of the scholarship time was spent at Australian Cotton Research Institute in Narrabri, where the researcher was exposed to the following laboratory methods that were carried out following an on-site irrigation sequence for the plots C1 and D1:  Total suspended solids,  Saturated soil pastes  Centrifuging soil pastes  Determination of chloride in water by Sherwood Chloride Analyser model 926 (coulometric method)  EC and pH measures  Determination of Na, K, Ca, and Mg in water by flame atomic absorption spectroscopy. Attendance at several cotton related seminars and spent time in the field learning about and assisting with related projects taking place at the research station. Effects on the stoichiometric ratios of cotton cropping soils have been varied throughout the treatments over the plots. At tthat time of analysis, the most obvious relationship that was found was between the dryland and irrigated plot soil Carbon storage due to Nitrogen addition. The addition of Nitrogen to dryland soils has been shown to have much less of an effect on soil Carbon storage levels than under an irrigated system. This project aligns with strategic aims in Best Practice through sustainable soil management and providing solutions for an increase in crop productivity yield per hectare through improving resource efficiency and also building workforce capacity by providing training and support for students undertaking tertiary study.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipCRDCen_US
dc.publisherAustralian National Universityen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries;ANU1601
dc.subjectsoilen_US
dc.subjectsoil stoichiometric relationshipsen_US
dc.subjectC, N and Pen_US
dc.subjecthypothesisen_US
dc.subjectratiosen_US
dc.subjectCarbonen_US
dc.subjectnitrogenen_US
dc.subjectphosphorusen_US
dc.subjectresearchen_US
dc.subjectextensionen_US
dc.subjectNSW DPIen_US
dc.subjectQDPIen_US
dc.subjectworkforceen_US
dc.subjectcapacityen_US
dc.subjecthuman resourcesen_US
dc.subjectfutureen_US
dc.subjectSherwood Chloride Analyser model 926 (coulometric method)en_US
dc.subjectmanagementen_US
dc.subjectstrategicen_US
dc.subjectagricultureen_US
dc.subjectfarmingen_US
dc.subjectcottonen_US
dc.subjectAustraliaen_US
dc.subjectNarrabrien_US
dc.subjectcentrifugeen_US
dc.subjectcrop rotationen_US
dc.subjectirrigationen_US
dc.subjectknowledgeen_US
dc.subjectSummer Scholarshipen_US
dc.titleStoichiometric Ratios of Cotton Soils Under Different Land Management Practicesen_US
dc.typeTechnical Reporten_US
Appears in Collections:2016 Final Reports

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