Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1/977
Title: Managing Helicoverpa spp on Cotton with Semiochemicals - The Preliminary Results
Authors: Dang, H
Moore, C
Singleton, A
Mensah, R
Issue Date: 13-Aug-2002
Publisher: Australian Cotton Growers Research Association
Abstract: Helicoverpa spp remain the most important pest in the Australian cotton industry. They are resistant to most of the insecticides used by the industry. The cotton industry is determined to reduce their independence against this pest. As a result there is a strong push by the industry in recent years to adopt a true IPM program in order to minimise insecticide use. Semio (signalling) chemical that may impact on pest behaviour are currently being studied to isolate potential chemicals for efficacy against cotton pests. Chemicals on the leaf surfaces of refuge crops, cotton cultivars and other plant species will be isolated , purified , formulated, bio assayed against cotton pests and the potential ones deployed in cotton IPM. Field and mesh house trials of different plant species and refuge crops have been screened for oviposition and feeding preference against Helicoverpa spp adults and larvae. Results, so far showed that several less preferred crops and plant species deter Helicoverpa ssp. adult oviposition and also cause mortalities in the larvae. An unidentified plant, codenamed &quote;PlantX&quote; was found to reduce Helicoverpa spp. Egg lay by 94 %. The top, middle and base leaves caused 89, 78 and 89 % mortalities respectively to H. punctigera second stage larvae. The seeds also caused 74% mortality to the larvae. Further studies are continuing to extract toxic compounds in PlantX and bioassay it against Helicoverpa spp. If successful a new IPM tool will be developed for cotton growers for use in IPM programs.
URI: http://www.insidecotton.com/xmlui/handle/1/977
Appears in Collections:2002 Australian Cotton Conference

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